Bulletin – 3rd Sunday in [Extra] Ordinary Time

Mass on Sunday, January 26, 2020 at 10 A.M. 


Remember our collection of non-perishable food items for the Winona Food Shelf


Remember to congratulate and thank Julie Quist when you see her for becoming our newest board member


Dear Friends,

Once again, we have the challenge this week in [Extra] Ordinary Time to “shine our lights” into the dark places in this world–a task that we are each up to!

Come; be with us this week!

Peace and love,

Pastor Kathy


Readings: 

  • Isaiah 8: 23–9:3
  • 1 Corinthians 1: 10-13, 17
  • Matthew 4: 12-23

All Are One Roman Catholic Church Safety Policy

 Every effort will be made to ensure the safety of all attendees at All Are One services and social activities.  Any violation of this policy will be reported immediately to local law enforcement.  (This statement was updated and reviewed with the Board of All Are One Roman Catholic church at the July 2, 2018 board meeting and was reviewed with the parish).

All Are One Roman Catholic church Statement as a Sanctuary Support Community

“We affirm that as a congregation of people of faith, we are taking seriously the call to provide sanctuary support in the Winona Sanctuary Network. We recognize that our immigrant neighbors are a vital part of our community and local economy and that due to a broken immigration system they have not all been allowed the legal protections that they deserve. To this end we will use our privilege and our resources to stand with our community members that are in fear of deportation. As a sanctuary support community we are able to do this by providing; prayers, security, time, money, advocacy, relationship, and fellowship to the degree that is within our power.”


 

Homily – 2nd Weekend in [Extra] Ordinary Time

Friends, this weekend brings our focus back to that time in our Church Year, Ordinary Time, while not a specific period like Advent, Christmas, Lent, or the Easter Season, is just as surely, an important time because this time of some 30 weeks, nearly 2/3 of our Church Year calls and challenges us to live out the messages instilled in us from our brother Jesus during those seemingly more special times named above.

And it is for this reason that I, as some others have chosen to name this part of our Church Year, “Extra” Ordinary Time, so that we wouldn’t forget its importance.  We only have to look at today’s readings to realize that we do not have a free-ride during Ordinary Time.

Isaiah and the God who inspires him, gets right to the point:  “You are my servant in whom I will be glorified.” Notice that we aren’t being asked here—there is just the realization that, “Yes,” this is the response that we will make in first having been loved by our God! It is almost as if God is saying, “Could you make any other response given what you know of my love for you?”  The prophet continues God’s words:  “I will make you a light to the nations,” and your light will be such that it will be seen, “to the ends of the earth!”

There is great joy here and we really shouldn’t miss that—it is much the same as we will see in upcoming weeks as Jesus calls his first disciples to be those same, “lights” that will shine to the ends of the world—or at least throughout the world within each of them lives.

The joy within those first followers was palpable when they said, “Master, where do you live?” and Jesus answered, “Come and see!” I am of course getting ahead of the scriptural story for today that simply identifies our brother Jesus as the One sent by our God to show us the way.  But one step really does lead to the next and our response to the knowledge that Jesus is the Christ—the Anointed One is to respond with the psalmist, “I am here to do your will!”

Paul then lets us know in this regard that he, “is called to be an apostle of Jesus,” and therefore tells the Corinthians that they are called to “be a holy people!”  “And what does that mean to be a holy people,” we might ask?  I would say that it calls us to be our best selves.  And going further, what does that in fact look like in our own lives?

Looking over my past week, a few things come to mind:

  • As you know, Dick Dahl stood in for me last weekend as I spent time with my family completing our Christmas celebration. He always tells me, “Doing this is his privilege!”  That in itself is wonderful!—certainly a way that he shines his light.  In the homily that Dick shared last week, he commented on serving twice monthly at the Catholic Worker house staffing that facility over the dinner hour.  Very honestly, he spoke of not looking forward to this service, but doing it anyway because he knows that we will find Jesus there!  I value his comments so much because they support me when I feel the same way.  I too instinctively know that I must go as well or else I make a sham of ever looking for Jesus any place else, especially here among the love and care and respect of all of you—if I can’t find him there; I shouldn’t expect to find him here, either.
  • I read a number of letters-to-the-editor of the National Catholic Reporter this week, probably 2/3 of them in support of the paper’s decision to name Nancy Pelosi, Catholic Newsmaker of the Year. Regardless of where any of us might be politically, I believe it is important to say that what Nancy Pelosi has done to earn this recognition went far beyond party and politics as she is accused of, by some—her actions were about patriotism—upholding the Constitution of this country that says that no one is above the law.  Now of course, everyone doesn’t see it that way and when a person decides, “to shine the light of our brother Jesus in our world, as we all must do if we are to be his followers; we can be certain that we too, as Pelosi, as Jesus, as Paul, may be ridiculed—but we must do it anyway.
  • As I prepared for this homily, I took a look at what I wrote 3 years ago at this time as one administration in Washington was ending and another about to begin. Throughout the rhetoric of the previous election year, there was much talk about “making America great again.”  I found myself then, as now, asking, what is not great about working for the weakest among us, securing healthcare for millions of people who had none, standing up for equality in marriage for all those who love each other, protecting the environment through laws that curb abuse, done simply for monetary gain, leading the way in making our world safer from nuclear proliferation, standing up for women in equal pay for equal work and for women’s rights over their own bodies?  All of the above are about “shining our light” as Jesus asks of each of us.

In his final speech to Congress, President Barack Obama challenged each of us to do our part for our country and the same could be said for our Church, and of our families, because all these entities are ours and they will only be as great as we each are great.  At that time, the president’s words were simple–we all need to lace up our shoes, put our feet on the ground and get going!”

I can’t help but reflect on what a different tone this is to so much of what is coming out Washington these days—the hate, the back-biting, the meanness, the smallness, the lies and lack of truth-telling—a tone so much about, “what is best for me,”  so devoid of service toward all the people which should be the guiding force of any and all who would ask to be an elected official of this great nation.

But with each New Year, in both Church and State, there is hope anew, for change. A new year’s letter from a friend had some hope-filled thoughts—here are a few:  walk more—to the library, the post office…go outside, even when it looks gray and cold, eat more vegetables, get more often into that appreciation state of mind, noticing all the things that are genuinely worth appreciating….

Our Church and our brother Jesus, calls us in today’s liturgy as throughout the entire Church Year, “to be lights” in our world, “to touch,” “to be seen with,” “to keep company with,” those we may not want to be with—to see their needs, to hear their stories, to do our parts and in so doing, to make life better for all, including ourselves.  I can still hear Barack Obama’s encouragement to us in that final speech—“Yes we can!”  Amen? Amen!

Bulletin – 2nd Weekend in [Extra] Ordinary Time

Mass on Saturday, January 18, 2020 at 4:30 P.M. 


Remember our weekly collection  of non-perishable food items for the Winona Volunteer Services Food Shelf 


Dear Friends,

We are back to Ordinary Time, which here at All Are One, we have come to designate as “extra” to call our attention to the fact that “Ordinary Time” isn’t just an in-between time around those special times of the Church Year, Advent-Christmas-Lent and Easter, but in many ways, just as significant, as it calls us to live out the lessons and challenges of these other significant times.

Come; be with us this week as we, together, attempt to be a community–challenged by the message of our brother, Jesus.

Peace and love,

Pastor Kathy


Readings: 

  • Isaiah 49: 3, 5-6
  • 1 Corinthians: 1: 1-3
  • John 1: 29-34

All Are One Roman Catholic Church Safety Policy

 Every effort will be made to ensure the safety of all attendees at All Are One services and social activities.  Any violation of this policy will be reported immediately to local law enforcement. (This statement was updated and reviewed with the Board of All Are One Roman Catholic church at the July 2, 2018 board meeting and was reviewed with the parish).

All Are One Roman Catholic church Statement as a Sanctuary Support Community

“We affirm that as a congregation of people of faith, we are taking seriously the call to provide sanctuary support in the Winona Sanctuary Network. We recognize that our immigrant neighbors are a vital part of our community and local economy and that due to a broken immigration system they have not all been allowed the legal protections that they deserve. To this end we will use our privilege and our resources to stand with our community members that are in fear of deportation. As a sanctuary support community we are able to do this by providing; prayers, security, time, money, advocacy, relationship, and fellowship to the degree that is within our power.”


 

Homily – Baptism of Jesus

Dear Friends, below find a homily from Pastor Dick Dahl who stood in for me last Sunday as I was away completing our Christmas celebration with our immediate family. Our gratitude to Pastor Dick for covering for me and for this wonderful homily–and my apologies for my lateness in getting it out to you!–Pastor Kathy


On New Year’s eve I had the pleasure of being invited to dinner at the home of friends whom I know through the Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship. After dinner we watched the movie “The Two Popes.” In it there are flashbacks to 1976 to 1983, when the Argentinian military dictatorship took thousands into custody, tortured, and who “disappeared,” never to be heard from again. During that time our present Pope Francis whose name was Jorge Mario Bergoglio, was head of the Jesuits in Buenos Aires. To appease the generals, he told two of his priests to stop working with the poor in the slums but which they refused to do. By his censuring of them, they lost the protection of the Church and were taken into custody and tortured for many months. Bergoglio came to recognize his sin in not standing up for them. He was sent to live and serve among the poor in a small village. In a moving scene when he first arrived to celebrate Mass with them, he sat down in front of them and said, “I have nothing to tell you. I need to listen to what you have to teach me.” The Holy Spirit opened his understanding and his heart to a new awareness as he found Jesus in the poor and the outcasts of society. 

In these first days of a New Year we see Jesus beginning something new–his public life, after three decades of living in obscurity. He entered the water of the Jordan with others to be baptized by John. Despite John’s protestations, Jesus did this to act out his identification with all who are sinners. He then went into the desert for forty days where the Spirit prepared him for his life especially in reaching out to the marginalized—lepers, the sick, the blind, the deaf, the lame, prostitutes, tax collectors, even a Roman soldier whose daughter was dying. 

It is no wonder that early Christians found the Servant songs in Isaiah, such as the one in our first reading today, to be describing Jesus: 

“Here is my servant whom I uphold, my chosen one in whom I am pleased. Upon him I have put my spirit; he shall bring forth justice to the nations. He will not cry out, nor shout, nor make his voice heard in the street. A bruised reed he will not break, and a dimly burning wick he will not quench.” 

We find a similar process of new understanding in chapter 10 of the Acts of the Apostles from which we heard a few verses in today’s second reading. It dramatically describes a member of the occupying Roman army whose name was 

Cornelius. He was a centurion who commanded 100 archers in the Italica cohort. Despite this, he is described as a man who prayed constantly and gave alms generously to the Jewish people. The Spirit came to Cornelius in a vision and called him to send some of his men to Joppa, a city by the sea, more than a day’s journey away, to find a man named Simon Peter and to bring that man to him. 

At at the same time the Spirit told Peter in a vision that the Centurion’s men were coming to get him and he was to go willingly with them. When the group finally arrived in Caesaria and came to Cornelius, the centurion fell down in reverence before Peter who immediately told him to get up–that he Peter is a human just like the centurion. Peter then described how God anointed Jesus with the Spirit and power, how Jesus went about doing good and healing the afflicted, how Jesus was put to death nailed to a tree but rose from death and was seen by witnesses who even ate and drank with him. 

While Peter was speaking the Spirit fell on all who were listening. Peter was astounded that the gift of the Spirit had been poured on on these Gentiles. He exclaimed, “I see that God shows no partiality. Rather in every nation whoever fears him and acts uprightly is acceptable to him.” 

So the readings today powerfully reveal the way God has continued through to bring about change and an ever more inclusive awareness of his presence in and love for all people. The Spirit came upon Jesus and prepared him for his ministry when Jesus emerged from the Jordan. Moved by the Spirit Jesus broke norms of rigidity and by his actions he showed God’s preference for the poor and outcasts. In the same way the Spirit led people in the early Christian community like Peter and Paul to see God in the lives of people different from them. 

Bergoglio was also led by the Spirit to find Christ in the poor, the helpless, the outcasts the imprisoned. As Pope he is now teaching and urging us to do the same—to recognize Jesus in people different from us, to see beyond distinctions of status, culture, politics and religion. In his recent Christmas message Francis denounced rigidity in the Church. He warned that “rigidity” in living one’s faith is creating a “minefield” of hatred and misunderstanding in a world where Christianity is increasingly irrelevant. He declared, “Tradition is not static, it’s dynamic.” 

The Spirit, promised to us by Jesus, enables us to be more open, to recognize him in those who look, think and act differently from what we are comfortable with. I think it is well summed up in a recent daily meditation sent by Father Richard Rohr in which he quotes the thoughts of his friend and colleague Brian McLaren who has spent the last two decades passionately advocating for “a new kind of Christianity.” Brian identifies shifts Christianity must make if it wants to serve as a universal path of spiritual transformation. The first shift is to become “decentralized and diverse.” Brian writes, “In other words, it will have the shape of a movement rather than an institution. It will be drawn together . . . by internal unity of way of life, mission, practices, and vision for the common good. . . . 

“This, of course, was Jesus’ original approach. He never announced to his disciples: ‘Hey folks, we’re going to start a new, centralized, institutional religion and name it after me.’ Instead, he played the role of a nonviolent leader and launched his movement with the classic words of movement, “Follow me” He used his power to empower others. He did great things to inspire his followers to do even greater things Rather than demand uniformity, he reminded his disciples that he had “sheep of other folds” He recruited diverse disciples who learned…his core vision and way of life. Then he sent these disciples out as apostles to teach and multiply his vision and way of life among ‘all the nations’.” 

So, as we proceed in this new year, with the hope it brings, I suggest that like Peter in his meeting with the centurion Cornelius, and Bergoglio’s immersion in the slums of the poor, that we seek to be open to the dynamic presence and enlightening action of the Spirit in our lives. Let us recognize the Jesus in people we consider outsiders, the ones we tend not to identify with, perhaps even people we may in all honesty not like. These are likely the ones we need to humbly approach as Bergoglio did, to learn from and pay attention to. 

Along with a lesbian friend from the Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship, I host at Bethany, the Catholic Worker House, twice a month. In all honesty I usually do not look forward to going there for my 3:30 to 8 PM shifts. I go there because it is the place I believe I find Jesus as surely as I would in the tabernacle of a church. 

This past week, one of the men who comes there daily for a meal is in his 70s and looks even older. He has been homeless since last summer and goes to the Warming Center to sleep. The Warming Center doesn’t open until 9 PM and Bethany House closes at 8 PM. So I have given him a ride to McDonalds downtown where for a dollar one can buy a cup of coffee and stay in a warm place for an hour. Several times I have given him the necessary dollar, but this past Wednesday he had some money. He was sharing the few dollars he had dollars with a couple others who also needed to go to McDonalds before the Warming Center opened. One was a woman in her early 40’s who had just been released from five months in jail and knew no one in Winona. The old man not only gave her a dollar, but when it looked like she had no gloves, offered her the warm pair he had. It turned out she did not need them, but I was struck by his generosity. I saw Jesus in him. 

I’d like to close with a prayer for our community that Father Rohr has posted with his meditations this week: 

O Great Love, thank you for living and loving in us and through us. May all that we do flow from our deep connection with you and all beings. Help us become a community that vulnerably shares each other’s burdens…. Listen to our hearts’ longings for the healing of our world.. . . Knowing you are hearing us better than we are speaking, we offer these prayers in all the holy names of God, Amen. 

 

Bulletin – Baptism of Jesus

Mass on Sunday, January 12, 2020 at 10 A.M. 


Please be thinking of whether God may be calling on you to serve on the All Are One Board of Directors–we need at least one new member! This is one of the easier jobs you will ever love doing! (: 


Remember our weekly collection of non-perishable food items for the Winona Volunteer Services Food Shelf


Dear Friends,

Robert and I will be away this Sunday–Pastor Dick Dahl will be standing in for us–we will be completing our Christmas celebrations with our son and daughter and their families this weekend.

Come; celebrate with Pastor Dick and the All Are One community!

Peace and love,

Pastor Kathy


Readings: 

  • Isaiah 42: 1-4, 6-7
  • Acts 10: 34-38
  • Matthew 3:  13-17

All Are One Roman Catholic Church Safety Policy

 Every effort will be made to ensure the safety of all attendees at All Are One services and social activities.  Any violation of this policy will be reported immediately to local law enforcement. (This statement was updated and reviewed with the Board of All Are One Roman Catholic church at the July 2, 2018 board meeting and was reviewed with the parish).

All Are One Roman Catholic church Statement as a Sanctuary Support Community

“We affirm that as a congregation of people of faith, we are taking seriously the call to provide sanctuary support in the Winona Sanctuary Network. We recognize that our immigrant neighbors are a vital part of our community and local economy and that due to a broken immigration system they have not all been allowed the legal protections that they deserve. To this end we will use our privilege and our resources to stand with our community members that are in fear of deportation. As a sanctuary support community we are able to do this by providing; prayers, security, time, money, advocacy, relationship, and fellowship to the degree that is within our power.”