Bulletin – 6th Sunday of Easter

Dear Friends,

Mass on Sunday, May 26, 2019 at 10 A.M. 


Remember our weekly collection of non-perishable food for Winona Volunteer Services


SAVE THE DATE: June 9, 2019, Sunday Mass at 10 A.M. will be First Communion Sunday for Liam Darst–come; be with us and welcome Liam “to the table” in this special way. 


SAVE THE DATE: July 7, 2019, Sunday–Mass on the Farm celebrating Mary of Magdala and all women–pot luck lunch to follow the 10 A.M. Mass. 


As the Easter Season continues, we continue as well to be challenged about doing the right (loving) thing.  Our gift Jesus says will be peace, not an easy peace perhaps, but peace, all the same.

Come; pray with us this week!

Peace and love,

Pastor Kathy


Readings: 

  • Acts 15: 1-2, 22-29
  • Revelation 21: 10-14, 22-23
  • John 14: 23-29

 

All Are One Roman Catholic Church Safety Policy

 Every effort will be made to ensure the safety of all attendees at All Are One services and social activities.  Any violation of this policy will be reported immediately to local law enforcement.

(This statement was updated and reviewed with the Board of All Are One Roman Catholic church at the July 2, 2018 board meeting and was reviewed with the parish).

All Are One Roman Catholic church Statement as a Sanctuary Support Community

“We affirm that as a congregation of people of faith, we are taking seriously the call to provide sanctuary support in the Winona Sanctuary Network. We recognize that our immigrant neighbors are a vital part of our community and local economy and that due to a broken immigration system they have not all been allowed the legal protections that they deserve. To this end we will use our privilege and our resources to stand with our community members that are in fear of deportation. As a sanctuary support community we are able to do this by providing; prayers, security, time, money, advocacy, relationship, and fellowship to the degree that is within our power.”

 

Homily – 5th Weekend of Easter

A day or two ago when I was lamenting to my sister-in-law, Jane, that I hadn’t yet written my homily and that time was short due to Mass being on Saturday this week; she said, “Make it short!” So Jane, this one’s for you!  The truth is; I always begin thinking about what I might write early in the week, but for one reason or another, this week, it just didn’t get done until yesterday!

As I suggested in the bulletin this week; hope might be a virtue for each of us to hold onto during the Easter Season and especially during the times that we currently find ourselves. We look to Church and State for leadership and find little in either place to be hopeful about.  That having been said; we do need to applaud the Minnesota bishops for their March 25, 2019 statement in support of “Driver’s Licenses for All,” already passed in our State House and slated to be taken up by our State Congress soon.

As you know, this would give the undocumented already living and working in our state more safety in driving as they would need to pass the same exam as we all do, which makes driving safer for all of us, plus it would allow them to get insurance, which again, protects us all.  In addition, it is the neighborly thing, and dare I say, Christian thing to do for those who harvest our crops and care for our animals that supply our state with dairy products and other produce—jobs that we basically don’t want to do.

If you haven’t had the opportunity to read the joint letter from the Minnesota bishops; I have put it on our website and our Face Book page—please take the time to read it!  Now if these same bishops could be in touch with each of their parishes, calling attention to their joint stand and encouraging dialog with their people through real, individual leadership; this would be great!

After you read their letter, you might take the next step and email our senator, Jeremy Miller, asking him to get on board with this most needed measure and support the bill coming before him very soon.  At present, this is clearly a political issue for him and we need to raise the bar so that he can make this a human, perhaps even, a spiritual issue.

With regard to all that is happening in Washington, or lack, thereof, our best action might be to pray along with those early Gentile followers of Jesus brought into the fold by Paul and Barnabas, spoken of in the first reading from Acts today.  And the prayer I am talking about is that of a committed, consistent person, every day, in every way.  I have realized, with some of the wisdom of the years, that I cannot make anyone change except for myself, but I can ask the Spirit of Jesus who we are told is continually, “renewing the face of the earth” to open the minds and hearts, ears and souls of those in public and church service to re-commit themselves to that noble goal that got them involved in the first place for the good of themselves and for all of us!

Luke, in the reading from Acts today also challenges us to “right living,” “persevering in our faith,” no matter, “the trials that we must undergo,” ever believing that we can, and do make a difference.  None of us can do it all, but each of us can do our part, no matter how small that might be.  The virtue of hope helps us to do this!  We should pray for an increase of faith and hope every day.

Each of the Scripture readings for this Easter weekend has a nugget to hold onto—to hope and believe in.  Revelation tells us that our God will always be with us,  that we will live to see an end to death, mourning, crying and tears, because Jesus has, “made all things new!”

My friends, I have to hope and believe that these Scriptures are true or I couldn’t do what I do pastoring this parish, in the face of no visible support from my brother priests. My prayer and wish for each of you is that you would continue to believe and never lose hope that good always triumphs.  I am grateful to each of you for all the generosity that I see in you, week after week, year after year.  We all here are an experiment attempting to show what an inclusive, Vatican II church can look like, a church in the memory of Jesus of Nazareth.  Have we succeeded?  I don’t know, but probably the true measure of our success or not will lie in Jesus’ words to us in today’s gospel from John—“all will know that you are my disciples,” [if they see you truly loving one another].

So friends, if we can own up to any action in our lives and truly say, “I did it out of love for God and my sisters and brothers on the journey,” then, we have been a success. If all we can say is, “I followed the law,” that really doesn’t make the grade! Following Jesus is really about opening our minds, hearts and souls to the face of God, all around us, in every creature, in all of creation—that is what Easter and the Incarnation are really all about and if there is a reward at the end of all that, well, good, but not a reason to do it in the first place!  Amen? Amen!

News Item

Hello Friends, 

Below find a letter from the Minnesota Bishops in support of Driver’s Licenses for All–a good letter! –Pastor Kathy


MN Bishops Urge House Support of Driver’s Licenses for Undocumented Immigrants

March 25, 2019

Dear Members:

Peace be with you. We, the bishops of the Minnesota Catholic Conference, write in support of H.F. 1500, which will provide a pathway for our undocumented brothers and sisters to obtain driver’s licenses. Enacting this legislative proposal is long overdue; there is urgency to act.

Re-opening our license system will allow Minnesota to address one component of our broken immigration system. Our immigrant brothers and sisters need reforms to ensure that they are not confined to the shadows and margins of our society. Apart from federal comprehensive immigration reform, offering driver’s licenses is one small measure the State of Minnesota can employ to make our roads safer and our communities more welcoming to the immigrants who already make important contributions to our economic, cultural, and social life.

Access to driver’s licenses will help many immigrants meet their daily obligations. In many parts of Minnesota, there is no public transportation, and undocumented persons have no ability to get to work, church, health services, or school, other than by driving illegally. Every day, they live in fear that getting stopped could mean permanent separation from their children, spouse, or parents.

In our parishes that serve many undocumented persons and their families, the inability to drive, or doing so without a license, is a major source of stress. Undocumented immigrants who have been able to obtain a license are now not able to do so because of new rules at the DMV requiring social security numbers.

Most of us cannot begin to imagine what loss of movement, or the fear of being deported and separated from our families while doing so, would mean in our lives. It is a terrible fear to impose on people and families in our community. And we must do something about it for our brothers and sisters.

Providing driver’s licenses to immigrants also serves the common good—it is surely in the best interests of our state to have people who are living among us and driving on our roads be able to do so safely and legally. In a number of states where similar “noncompliant” licenses have been created, such as Utah and New Mexico, the rates of uninsured motorists declined.

This legislation does not “reward” those who have broken the law. Providing driver’s licenses is a concrete measure of solidarity that takes into account the complexity of the immigration issue. It seeks to protect the well-being of undocumented persons considering the reality of their situation and actual prospects for immigration reform and enforcement. There is little likelihood that most of Minnesota’s 90,000 immigrants will be deported—immigrants who pay taxes and serve in their churches and communities. Therefore, how can we both respond to their needs and promote the common good?

We hope today that we as Minnesotans follow the most common biblical moral exhortation—to welcome the stranger—and remember that our families, too, were once strangers in this land who arrived with the same hopes that our undocumented community has today. Though Congress has failed, we hope we can do something meaningful and important for thousands of immigrants in our midst.
Thank you for your consideration and for your service to the people of Minnesota.

Respectfully yours,

The Most Rev. Bernard A. Hebda, Archbishop of St. Paul and Minneapolis
The Most Rev. Michael J. Hoeppner, Bishop of Crookston
The Most Rev. John LeVoir, Bishop of New Ulm
The Most Rev. John M. Quinn, Bishop of Winona-Rochester
The Most Rev. Paul D. Sirba, Bishop of Duluth
The Most Rev. Donald J. Kettler, Bishop of St. Cloud
The Most Rev. Andrew H. Cozzens, Auxiliary Bishop of St. Paul & Minneapolis

Bulletin – 5th Weekend of Easter

Dear Friends,

Mass on Saturday, May 18, 2019 at 4:30 P.M. 


Remember food collection for the Winona Volunteer Services food shelf.


SAVE THE DATE:  Sunday, July 7, 2019, 10 A.M.– Mary of Magdala–Mass on the Farm and Potluck!  


 We continue in the Easter Season and it seems that “hope” should be the virtue that we all hold onto–hope in ourselves and hope in each other to truly live as Easter people.  Think what our world would be like if we Christians all truly lived as Jesus taught us!

Come; join us as we pray, celebrate and ponder his messages this Saturday at 4:30 P.M.

Peace and love,

Pastor Kathy


Readings: 

  • Acts 14: 21-27
  • Revelation 21: 1-5
  • John 13: 31-33, 34-35

All Are One Roman Catholic Church Safety Policy

 Every effort will be made to ensure the safety of all attendees at All Are One services and social activities.  Any violation of this policy will be reported immediately to local law enforcement.  (This statement was updated and reviewed with the Board of All Are One Roman Catholic church at the July 2, 2018 board meeting and was reviewed with the parish).

All Are One Roman Catholic church Statement as a Sanctuary Support Community

“We affirm that as a congregation of people of faith, we are taking seriously the call to provide sanctuary support in the Winona Sanctuary Network. We recognize that our immigrant neighbors are a vital part of our community and local economy and that due to a broken immigration system they have not all been allowed the legal protections that they deserve. To this end we will use our privilege and our resources to stand with our community members that are in fear of deportation. As a sanctuary support community we are able to do this by providing; prayers, security, time, money, advocacy, relationship, and fellowship to the degree that is within our power.”


 

Homily – 4th Sunday of Easter–Mothers’ Day

Dear Friends, 

I asked my daughter, Eryn Redig Potthast to do the homily this morning reflecting on what it means to be a mom. In addition, I told her if she could “tie” her reflections to the Scriptures of the day, all the better. Now with all humility, even though she is my daughter; I think she did an excellent job, on both counts! Thank you Eryn and Happy Mothers’ Day! 


 

Thank you for the opportunity this morning to share a few thoughts with you on this Mother’s Day, 2019.  The readings today don’t expressly talk about being Mothers, but there is some wisdom to be seen, I believe, that we can tie into this special day.  

To begin with, in our first reading from the Acts of the Apostles, we see Paul and Barnabas trying to convert the Gentiles after they run into trouble with their own people who become jealous of the popularity they are gaining with the city.  You have to want to see this, but this isn’t too different from being a parent, and often a Mom, especially with a strong-willed child. You can try all the arguments – “But this really is good for you! I’m just trying to help! I’m actually giving you something you want!”  In the case of Paul and Barnabas, it’s everlasting life being offered (pretty good right?), but with your kids, it could be anything. Sometimes though, if it isn’t their idea, or they see someone getting more attention than them, well, there isn’t much you can do to change their mind.  What you find you can and need to do, as a parent, is be patient, which is by no means easy. God, as parent, has to become patient with us too, as we figure out what is good for us, and come to our own decisions. It takes longer, but in the end, if you can own that decision, you are much more likely to want to stick with it.  God, thankfully, is a patient parent, a patient Mom.

In the second reading from Revelation, although it probably is not directly referring to this, in light of the day we are celebrating, I’m going to see this as a metaphor for a parent who is responsible for nurturing and caring for life.  First of all, we see an immense crowd with all represented – all types, all nations, all tribes, all languages. So, this applies to us all. And in this reading, these are those who have been tested – parents, yes? Who of us who are parents (or those who have cared for children) have not been tested? Repeatedly?  But in the end of this reading we see the beautiful idea of the Shepherd, taking care of us. They will never be hungry, never thirsty, and God will wipe every tear from their eyes. If that isn’t a parent, I don’t know what is. At our basic levels, isn’t this what we are doing? Elliot says to me, “Water in my eyes!” when he gets upset or needs comforting.  I know that means he wants me to wipe away his tears – and I do so because I am his Mom. God is a Shepherd – a Mom Shepherd.

The Gospel from John is short and sweet, but it talks about the Good Shepherd – The Sheep will hear my voice. I know them and they follow me. When you first become pregnant, what do people always tell you?  Talk to your baby so he/she will know your voice. I used to read to Elliot when I was pregnant, and Adam and I would talk and sing to him. He knew our voice. My Mom came and helped us out for 6 weeks, as you all remember, when Elliot was born, and she spent a lot of time with him and talking to him when he was so little – they know each other now on a level that few other do, because of that voice connection.  I think the important take away here is that we are connected deeply to people because of communication in many forms, but that connection through our voices is unique to each of us and because of that, we know where are loved ones are when they call out to us. When Adam and I would walk into the NICU after Elliot was born, we could hear his cry from down the hall because we knew his unique voice. Each time I hear his voice in a crowd of other kids, I know him because I know his unique voice.  God is the parent who knows our unique voices.

So that’s the readings, but I have just a couple more thoughts about Mother’s Day.  There was a time in my life when I thought I would never be a Mom, even though I always wanted to be one.  My hold up was that I wanted to find the right person to share the experience with and raise a child with, but I hadn’t found him yet and thought I never would.  So, I immersed myself in my friends’ kids and tried to be, not their Mom, but someone who could be a responsible person in their lives who they could depend on. Then I found Adam and we are now on this parent adventure together, but that time of being a surrogate parent to those cool kids was something I always treasure (and thank my friends for allowing me to be a part of that).  It truly takes a community to raise a child, right?

When Mom asked me to consider doing this reflection, I thought, huh, so what do I have to say about being a parent?  Or a Mom? These five years have gone fast and being a parent is hard work, but so unbelievably rewarding – and I’ve learned so much! I look around this room though, and I see a wealth of wisdom to draw on from those who have been on the journey much longer than I.  For that I’m eternally grateful. And Mom and Dad, after experiencing some of this stuff, especially with Elliot where I can see myself looking straight back at me, I respect you even more than I grew to do over the years already.☺ There were times when I know raising me was not easy but I’m so glad you took the time to be patient with me, to be a Shepherd to me, and to get to know my own unique voice.

Raising a child is not easy and it takes many wonderful people to help bring a pretty cool kid up in this world.  I was lucky growing up because I had my Mom and Dad, but I also had my Grandma and Grandpa Redig living across the yard from me, and I had my Aunt Jane and Joan growing up with me too.  It was like having another two Moms available to help guide me, give me advice, and keep an eye on me. There are many people in this world who aren’t biological parents, but they sure put in the time, love, and care, and are devoted to kids in the same way.  And these women should be celebrated today too because they are the support system that make this lifelong job a whole lot easier.

So today, I ask you to celebrate all those women in our lives who help to bring up the little people in our lives.  Our lives are much bigger, richer, fuller, and complete because of all who care for children. We strive today, together to be patient, to shepherd our little people, and to let those unique voices shine.

Amen? Amen!